Ghana

Long, expensive & messy: the realities of sector change

Long, expensive & messy: the realities of sector change

By Patrick Moriarty, Harold Lockwood, Vida Duti and Sarah Carriger In the last post in this series we described our approach to changing the whole system to deliver water services that people can count on: not just for a few years, but for life. We laid out the main phases in this change: initiation, learning […]

More energy into water

More energy into water

Tomorrow is World Water Day, with the topic of “water and energy”. I see obvious issues coming by on the water-energy nexus (which by the way is one of those development sector buzz words that I start disliking more every day. I hope the next buzz word is a bit more, uh, sparkling), such as […]

Heading for the exit

Heading for the exit

Next week, the Dutch parliament will discuss the multi-annual collaboration plans for its bilateral development cooperation with some 15 partner countries. This could be a pretty dull and technical affair, were it not for the fact that these plans give an interesting insight into what the end of aid may look like. But, it also […]

Who serves the in-betweeners?

Who serves the in-betweeners?

By: Marieke Adank, IRC Small towns and peri-urban areas are by definition found in the grey area in between the truly urban and the truly rural. Also in terms of water supply, fifty shades of grey are found in these types of settlements. People living here often fall in between the cracks of urban utilities […]

The end of aid

The end of aid

By Ton Schouten – I was asked to convince a Texas businessman to support investing in government water systems. I tried: The evidence shows that more than 30% of water systems in Ghana are not functional and that only around 20% of the functioning water systems provide a basic level of service: water of WHO accepted […]

Users perception of rural water services in Ghana: A case of satisfaction or dissatisfaction?

Users perception of rural water services in Ghana: A case of satisfaction or dissatisfaction?

By: Tyhra Kumasi, Senior Research Officer, Triple-S Ghana Dora is a 33 year old teacher living in Agbedrafo in the Akatsi South District. She depends on the only handpump in the community for her daily domestic chores; however she laments the difficulties in getting access to fetch water. According to Dora “even though fetching is on a […]

Tracking change and sharpening indicators

Tracking change and sharpening indicators

By: Marieke Adank, IRC Now almost 2 year ago, I was involved in an assessment of the state of water service provision in 3 districts in Ghana. This assessment was done in order to test draft service delivery indicators developed by the Community Water and Sanitation Agency, in collaboration with IRC, under its Triple-S Project, […]

Insurance for rural water supplies – a good idea?

Insurance for rural water supplies – a good idea?

Email requests sometimes trigger the most interesting thoughts and ideas, particularly when there is no straightforward answer. Today, I received a question on whether at IRC we know of any experience with insurances for rural water supply. This question has reached us several times in the past year. Whereas my first answer to the question […]

Not-so-limited mechanised boreholes

Not-so-limited mechanised boreholes

Elder Joe, whom you still may remember from a previous blog post, is the proud secretary of a water committee in the outskirts of Odumase town in Ghana. The committee looks after a handpump that was installed only last year. The committee is doing well. He shows us the booklet with the bank statements and […]

The caretaker always SMSes twice

The caretaker always SMSes twice

The costs of getting spare parts for handpumps can sometimes be higher than the costs of the spares themselves. Imagine a handpump where some of the nuts of bolts have worn out. These might cost a dollar at a spare part retail dealer; but the bus ticket to town might cost three dollars. That is […]

On strokes and leaks, or how to assess functionality and service levels of handpumps

On strokes and leaks, or how to assess functionality and service levels of handpumps

By: Marieke Adank, programme officer at IRC The Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) in Ghana is developing a framework for assessing and monitoring water services. In this, it will monitor the extent to which service levels are met, as well as the performance of water service providers and service authorities as per nationally set […]

At the start of true scale in monitoring

At the start of true scale in monitoring

From testing monitoring service delivery indicators and tools in 3 pilot districts by the CWSA and Triple-S to applying monitoring at scale in 64 Ghanaian districts, one quarter of the country. That is what will happen in the framework of SMARTerWASH in the coming 3 years.

Sustainability checks, clauses and compacts – USAID and DGIS lead the way

Sustainability checks, clauses and compacts – USAID and DGIS lead the way

By Stef Smits Over the past year, there has been quite a bit of buzz in the WASH sector on the sustainability clause  that DGIS seeks to include in its contacts with implementers. The pros and cons of this have been widely debated . A key component of the clauses is to have sustainability checks […]

Vida’s story

Vida’s story

In this clip, Vida Duti tells her personal story and shares the reasons why she decided to work in development.

Piloting and scaling up

Piloting and scaling up

In this interview, Vida Duti explains how Triple-S Ghana works at all levels in order to move from piloting in the three districts, to scaling-up.